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Bergonzi is the first and most noted individual from the Bergonzi family, a renowned gathering of luthiers from Cremona, Italy, a city with a rich convention of stringed instrument fabricators.

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Carlo Bergonzi


Carlo Bergonzi (21 December, 1683 – 9 February, 1747) was an Italian luthier who apprenticed with Hieronymus Amati, worked together with Joseph Guarneri, and is viewed as the best understudy of Antonio Stradivari.

Bergonzi is the first and most noted individual from the Bergonzi family, a renowned gathering of luthiers from Cremona, Italy, a city with a rich convention of stringed instrument fabricators.

Early life and vocation

Bergonzi's guardians lived nearby to Stradivari in the Piazza San Domenico in Cremona. Bergonzi apprenticed under Stradivari and inevitably was given the greater part of Stradivari's repair business. Since his repair administrations were sought after, Bergonzi was not able to give an ideal opportunity for creating his very own considerable lot instruments. Bergonzi violin outlines depended on the Stradivari and Guarneri layouts.

Carlo Bergonzi violinViolins

Bergonzi marks change, yet ordinarily record date, name, and area: Anno 1733, Carlo Bergonzi fece in Cremona.

In 1740, he made one of his finest violins, the Kreisler Bergonzi, which was thusly named after violinist Fritz Kreisler. At one time it was likewise possessed by violinist Itzhak Perlman. Both Kreisler and Perlman performed and recorded with it.

It is realized that numerous instruments that bear his mark are inauthentic. A cello once claimed by Pablo Casals was for a long time thought to be a Bergonzi as a result of the name it bore designated: "Carlo Bergonzi . . . 1733." It was later found to have really been made by Matteo Goffriller. In 1881 an amazing court case was held in London over cases that the understood luthier Georges Chanot III had given a fake Bergonzi mark to a violin and afterward sold it as real. His misdirection was found by violin-creator William Ebsworth Hill yet Chanot qualified his affirmation of blame by guaranteeing this was a basic practice in the violin-offering business; the court was unconvinced by his clarification and discovered him blameworthy.
 

Bergonzi family of luthiers

  • Michele Angelo (ca. 1722–1758), eldest Son of Carlo I.
  • Zosimo (ca. 1725–1777), younger Son of Carlo I.
  • Carlo II. (1758–1838 Cremona), younger son of Zosimo
  • Nicola (ca. 1746–1796) eldest son of Zosimo

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References

  • Cowling, Elizabeth (1975). The Cello. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. ISBN 0-684-14127-2.
  • Dmitry Gindin: "The Late Cremonese Violin Makers" Edizioni Novecento, 2002